Retrospective

Thursday, April 8, 2010

That Bank with the Trees

This blog, like a tree, is growing organically, and branches grow as a result of patient searches through the tangle of the Internet and comments from readers. Out of curiosity I entered the phrase, "the bank with the trees" and was surprised to see "The Care of Trees" featured the Wauconda bank on their Web site.

They said, "The Care of Trees worked closely with architects and builders to develop ways to minimize impact to tree roots, create water distribution channels for root systems, and carry out the architect's vision of building within nature."

And, they featured several photos of the building with the giant oak trees, a building that grew out of a need and creative inspiration, just as this blog is growing. . .

Has the bank, under new ownership retained the same spirit as its predecessor, while wearing the mantle, "that bank with the trees...?"

http://www.thecareoftrees.com/index.php/about/portfolio_zoom/wauconda_bank/
Also see "Care of Trees - Wauconda Bank" under "About the Architect" on the side bar to this blog.

Photo from web site: http://www.cnr.berkeley.edu/comtf/html/maintaining__oak_tree_health.html

2 comments:

R said...

I was instrumental in working with Don during this design and throughout the construction process. During our time together, I learned a great deal about life from a very intelligent and kind man. It was an experience that I will never forget and am truly honored to have befriended him. Reid French

R said...

Don was an intelligent and kind man who I met during our design and construction of the addition to the 'Wauconda National Bank'. I was the Executive Vice President in charge of the project through its fruition. I have to thank not only Don for his inspiration and guidance but the board of our bank at that time to have the courage to do something good for the community despite a great deal of effort. The project came in under budget with Don's help and it stands today as a testament to his dedication to fine architecture and conservancy. Reid French